Tags: occupy oakland
Fair Food activists ramping up for a Labor Day of Action with Publix protests across southeast market states!
This Labor Day weekend, a weekend in which we honor the contributions of workers to our society, Fair Food activists across the southern states that make up Publix’s market — from Homestead to Sarasota in Florida to Nashville, Atlanta, and more — are taking action to support the men and women who harvest Florida’s tomatoes!

For years, Publix has refused to join companies like Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, Burger King, McDonalds and others in supporting the CIW’s Fair Food Program. This Labor Day weekend, you can join with people from your school, congregation or community group to call on Publix to join the Fair Food Program and do its part to support the groundbreaking collaboration among workers, growers, and purchasers that is changing wages and working conditions in Florida’s fields today.

If you wish to join in the Labor Day Weekend of Action, please contact the folks at Interfaith Action of Southwest Florida by emailing jordan@interfaithact.org or calling 239-986-9101. They’ll let you know of any plans already underway in your area, supply you a template press release in order to publicize your action, and do whatever else they can to ensure that your action is a success. And don’t forget to take pictures for a photo report on the CIW website!

And, just in case you need a pinch of additional motivation to get you over the hump and into action, have a look at the video from Day Six of this past spring’s Fast for Fair Food:


Fast for Fair Food: The Ones We’ve Been Waiting For 3-10-2012 from Coalition of Immokalee Workers on Vimeo.

Fair Food activists ramping up for a Labor Day of Action with Publix protests across southeast market states!

This Labor Day weekend, a weekend in which we honor the contributions of workers to our society, Fair Food activists across the southern states that make up Publix’s market — from Homestead to Sarasota in Florida to Nashville, Atlanta, and more — are taking action to support the men and women who harvest Florida’s tomatoes!

For years, Publix has refused to join companies like Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, Burger King, McDonalds and others in supporting the CIW’s Fair Food Program. This Labor Day weekend, you can join with people from your school, congregation or community group to call on Publix to join the Fair Food Program and do its part to support the groundbreaking collaboration among workers, growers, and purchasers that is changing wages and working conditions in Florida’s fields today.

If you wish to join in the Labor Day Weekend of Action, please contact the folks at Interfaith Action of Southwest Florida by emailing jordan@interfaithact.org or calling 239-986-9101. They’ll let you know of any plans already underway in your area, supply you a template press release in order to publicize your action, and do whatever else they can to ensure that your action is a success. And don’t forget to take pictures for a photo report on the CIW website!

And, just in case you need a pinch of additional motivation to get you over the hump and into action, have a look at the video from Day Six of this past spring’s Fast for Fair Food:

Fast for Fair Food: The Ones We’ve Been Waiting For 3-10-2012 from Coalition of Immokalee Workers on Vimeo.

Occupy LA …

Occupy LA …

Tags: occupy LA
Tags: occupy
thepeoplesrecord:

Escalating Chicago gun violence: 19 shot on Thursday night, early Friday morningAugust 24, 2012
Police say 13 people were shot and wounded in a 30-minute spate of violence in Chicago, including eight gunned down on a single street.
Authorities have been battling an increase in homicides in the city where some aldermen complain gangs have no fear of the police.
Police say a drive-by shooting on Chicago’s South Side late Thursday wounded seven men and one woman ranging in age from 14 to 20 years. Two of the victims were taken to Comer Children’s Hospital. Most are in stable condition. Police say the 19-year-old woman wounded was shot in the arm while walking to work.
Five people were wounded in three other shootings around the same time.
Police say 19 people were shot in Chicago on Thursday night and early Friday.
Source
Mostly every news source on my Facebook feed was posting about the Empire State shooter. Way farther down, one source had posted about these Chicago shootings. A completely random, mass shooting that wounded teenagers and people on their way to work. Horrifying. 
On Monday, we posted about how Chicago’s gun violence reflects a political & economic failing, not a moral one. 

thepeoplesrecord:

Escalating Chicago gun violence: 19 shot on Thursday night, early Friday morning
August 24, 2012

Police say 13 people were shot and wounded in a 30-minute spate of violence in Chicago, including eight gunned down on a single street.

Authorities have been battling an increase in homicides in the city where some aldermen complain gangs have no fear of the police.

Police say a drive-by shooting on Chicago’s South Side late Thursday wounded seven men and one woman ranging in age from 14 to 20 years. Two of the victims were taken to Comer Children’s Hospital. Most are in stable condition. Police say the 19-year-old woman wounded was shot in the arm while walking to work.

Five people were wounded in three other shootings around the same time.

Police say 19 people were shot in Chicago on Thursday night and early Friday.

Source

Mostly every news source on my Facebook feed was posting about the Empire State shooter. Way farther down, one source had posted about these Chicago shootings. A completely random, mass shooting that wounded teenagers and people on their way to work. Horrifying. 

On Monday, we posted about how Chicago’s gun violence reflects a political & economic failing, not a moral one. 

” Homelessness and Children in USA ” !!!

It’s once again time for school. Excited (and not so excited) students are heading back to the classroom with new school supplies, new clothes and maybe a new lunchbox. They’ll see old friends and make new friends and, if they can, settle down to learn information that will help them grow and succeed in life.

Homelessness and children…

But what about homeless children? They don’t have a home to go back to after school. Some are living in motels, some staying with relatives and friends, while others live at shelters and rescue missions like Joy Junction. Some are even living out of cars. Some move so often that that they have to move schools, miss class, or fail to go to school altogether.

As this article puts it, “[Homelessness] fundamentally affects how you are able to function in life. This is particularly true for students… who often come to school hungry, without enough sleep, and without having done their homework because they lack the supplies and the space necessary to do it.”

These, and other problems, are the problems that homeless school children face every day.

The Impact of Homelessness on Children

It is estimated that one in 50 children is homeless in the United States. For the 2009-2010 school year, APS estimated that 5,000 school-aged youth in Albuquerque were homeless—and that isn’t counting the fact that nearly half of all homeless children are under the age of six.

In addition to keeping children from learning the vital information they will need to escape their situation and succeed in life, homelessness causes other problems for children that can be just as debilitating.

Studies have found that children who are homeless are less healthy and have more chronic health problems than children who have homes. According to the National Center on Family Homelessness, children who experience homelessness:

  • Are sick 4 times as often as other children. Problems include:
    • Four times as many respiratory infections
    • Twice as many ear infections
    • Five times the gastrointestinal problems
    • Four times more likely to develop asthma
  • Go hungry at twice the rate of other children
  • Have high obesity rates due to nutritional deficiencies
  • Have three times the rate of emotional and behavioral problems than non-homeless children

When it comes to development and behavioral problems, children who are homeless are four times more likely to show delayed development and twice as likely to have learning disabilities as children who have a home.

The stress and emotional impact of being homeless also cause learning disabilities. Academic performance is hampered by conditions like poor cognitive development. Homeless children are more likely to score poorly on math, reading, and spelling tests and to be held back a year.

With the combination of learning disabilities and emotional trauma created by homelessness, few homeless children have the means and motivation to graduate, which will only deposit them back into the cycle of poverty and homelessness. One report even estimated the number of homeless children in the US who will not graduate from high school at 1.16 million.

How You Can Help

The best way to help these children is to spread the word. Without a community-wide effort and acknowledgement of the problem, programs to help homeless kids won’t receive funding and children won’t be able to benefit; movements for help and change won’t begin.

You can also donate to Joy Junction! We send our youngest guests to school so that they don’t miss out on learning. You can donate school supplies, backpacks and clothing, and you can donate to our Children’s Charity.

You can also donate to our Together, We Can expansion campaign. Through our expansion, we will be able to help more children and their families get back on their feet and back to a stable life.

Tags: OWS